AGazine   October 2010

The Online Magazine of the Academic Games Leagues of America

AGLOA Logo

News and Notes

Upcoming Tournaments

  • The Michigan League of Academic Games held its second Saturday tournaments on October 16. The results are posted here.
  • The IU4 (Intermediate Unit 4) League in Pennsylvania held its On-Sets tournament for all divisions on October 14 in the Student Union at Slippery Rock University. (At every football game at Michigan Stadium, the announcer gives the score of the Slippery Rock game.)
    • The next competition will be Middle/Junior/Senior Propaganda on November 3 at the same site.
    • Elementary Propaganda will be held November 15.

Odds 'n Ends


Outstanding Senior

 

Rachel Ribando Gros
Rachel Ribando Gros

After playing academic games for one year at Mount Carmel Academy in New Orleans, Rachel Ribando Gros transferred to the Louisiana School for Math, Science, and the Arts in Natchitoches LA (NACK-a-tish), over 275 miles away from the closest Academic Games League.
  • Instead of joining a new club or team, Rachel brought academic games with her to her new school.
  • During her junior and senior years, she recruited, organized, and trained students at her new school to compete in academic games. Some, like her, had played in a league in the New Orleans area, but others had never heard of academic games.
  • On several occasions, Rachel organized trips for her team to compete in New Orleans and Jefferson Parish local tournaments.
  • Her efforts culminated each year in LSMSA students participating in the national tournament.
  • One of Rachel's teammates wrote:

We have raised close to $2,000 for our trip [to nationals], and we are, without a doubt, one of the most active clubs in our school. We meet twice a week for two-hour practices on top of our already busy schedules. It is an honor to be able to teach our fellow classmates how to play the games that we have come to love.

  • Dwayne Fontenette wrote this on the nomination form for Rachel.

Her love and enthusiasm for the program is contagious. Regardless of the outcome of a competition, Rachel always keeps a smile on her face ande conducts herself in the most sportsmanlike manner.

Rachel opened the doors to academic games for many students in her area who otherwise would not be involved in the program. She gave of herself and her time to allow others to benefit from the academic games program.

  • Rachel's perseverance was rewarded not only by winning an Outstanding Senior Award but also with the Senior On-Sets individual championship.

Outstanding Educator

Teresita Collins has coached academic games for ten years at St. Helen's Catholic School in Vero Beach FL.
  • Teresita excels in coaching LinguiSHTIK. The number of students playing the game in the Indian River County League has doubled since she started coaching.
  • Locally, her teams regularly take first place in both Elementary and Middle Divisions in Equations as well as Ling. Sometimes, they will sweep the top three spots in the standings.
  • Teresita is a judge at the local, state, and national levels. She has served on the LinguiSHTIK Appeals Panel at nationals for two years.
  • Lorrie Scott, director of the Indian River league, wrote this in her nomination:

Teresita has a wonderful way with children from the youngest fifth graders to the most "sophisticated" eighth graders. Her own team members love and respect her. It takes only a short time for all the members of the county team to feel the same way about her.

Teresita Collins
Teresita Collins with presenter Lorrie Scott

Down Memory Lane

Here are some variations (rules) played in the Greater Lansing (MI) Equations League during its 1984 season.

  • No Rule - A player may choose to state "No Rule," at the time the rules are being stated.
  • Decimal and Multiple Digits Rule - The Solution writer will do the following:
    1) Insert on his paper decimal points somewhere in the numerals of the Goal,
    2) Insert decimal points somewhere in the numerals of the Solution, unless they are to be interpreted as whole numbers, and
    3) May use multiple-digit numerals in the Solution if those numerals along with a % sign, or a decimal point, represent a number n, such that 0 < n < 1.
  • Computer Base - Both sides of the equation may be interpreted as base-two expressions. When so doing, even digits will be interpreted as zero and odd digits as one. Three-digit numerals may be used in the Solution. Also, when this rule is selected, up to five-digit numerals may be used in the Goal. The two sides of the expression need not be in the same base but their interpretation must be expressed in writing. If interpreting the expression in Base Ten, then two-digit numerals may not be used in the Solution.
  • Add to Goal - On his turn, instead of a regular move, a player may insert an additional cube from Resources in the Goal. The cube may be placed anywhere in the Goal. However, the limit of five cubes in the Goal, with no more than two consecutive digits (except in Computer Base), still prevails.

 

THIS ISSUE

News and Notes

Upcoming Tournaments

Odds 'n Ends

Outstanding Educator

Teresita Collins

Outstanding Senior

Rachel Ribando Gros

Down Memory Lane

1984 Equations Variations

September AGazine